You should get rid of hotspot shield. I have read reviews on it, and it is basically a piece of crap. Try “The Free VPN”. Check the link below. -Fresh Source(s): http://alternativeto.net/software/thefre…

You should get rid of hotspot shield. I have read reviews on it, and it is basically a piece of crap. Try “The Free VPN”. Check the link below. -Fresh Source(s): http://alternativeto.net/software/thefre…

Ge rib of hotsopt shield 

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TED brings innovation talk to Intel

This file photo shows an emplyee with a smatphone, at the Intel smartphones’ research center in Toulouse, on March 2, 2012. Potentially world-changing passions of those working behind the scenes at the leading computer chip maker were spotlighted at Intel on Wednesday in the first TED event produced exclusively in a company with the employees being the stars. Intel researcher Jennifer Healey stepped onto a stage decorated with a mad scientist’s lab in mind and made her case for gossiping cars. Ads by Google PHD Scientific Computing – HCI Mobile Interaction – cs.colostate.edu/~jgruiz/prospective-grads/ Her place was soon taken by colleague Eric Dishman, who brought the audience to its feet with a poignant tale weaving a transplant that saved his life with his vision to re-invent how health care is handled. Potentially world-changing passions of those working behind the scenes at the leading computer chip maker were spotlighted at Intel on Wednesday in the first TED event produced exclusively in a company with the employees being the stars. TED—originally known as Technology, Entertainment and Design—has built a global following for its online videos of inspiring talks devoted to “ideas worth spreading.” Presentations, made available free online at ted.com and other venues, have traditionally come from the non-profit group’s annual conferences and at sanctioned satellite TED events. This week marked the first time TED went behind the walls of a corporation to produce talks bearing its trademark combination of brilliance, innovation, and heartfelt drive to make the world a better place. “There is a gigantic well of interesting ideas in corporations that are not tied to products but to activism and social impact,” said TEDGlobal director Bruno Giussani, who hosted the TED@Intel event. “Our goal is to use the TED format to unlock some of those ideas and make them more visible.” Healey shared research aimed at letting cars use short-range signals to share information ranging from where they are and how fast they are going to what is happening inside or outside vehicles. “Our cars can talk about us behind our backs and it can be a good thing,” Healey said. “Let your car gossip about you; it is going to make the roads a lot safer.” For example, cars could confide in one another about a speeding motorcyclist approaching from behind or a problem in the road ahead. Ads by Google Information processing – Software, hardware, robotics, A.I., algorithms, web, neuroscience. – http://www.technology.org Intel is backing testing of using sensors, cameras and position location technology in cars along with radio signals to let them “talk” to one another when close by, according to Healey. Research is also being done into letting cars detect when drivers are looking away from the road, perhaps turning their attention to a mobile phone, car radio or cup of coffee, she added. “We can predict who is going to have the accident and which cars should move out of the way to make the safest route,” Healey said. “These technologies exist today; the biggest problem we face is getting people to share data.” Dishman plugged a wand made by Mobisante in Washington state into a smartphone and did an on-stage ultrasound scan on his abdomen, sharing the image real-time in an online consultation with a doctor. “This is an example of mobile, social and analytic technologies; a foundation of what is going to make personal health care possible,” Dishman said. Dishman laid out a vision of shifting medical care from hospitals to homes, with people coordinating exams and treatment with teams of professionals. He said that his Intel team is exploring the approach in a project working with seniors in China. “TED stages are often about celebrating innovations and technologies,” Dishman said. “But, until all these technologies are available it is up to us to take care of ourselves and each other.” Talks ranged from efficient ways to fuel deep space exploration to being a “plucky rebel” in a corporate workplace or being technically fit to parent. TED@Intel was a chance to showcase a personal, passionate side of chip making, according to Intel global director of co-marketing Elizabeth Broers. “It is all about silicon at the very rudimentary level, but you put it together and there are big stories,” Broers said, referring to the basic chip material. “We are thinking about what those technologies will mean for you,” she continued. “Not just faster processing power but what that power enables around health care, safety, education and even cars

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-03-ted-intel.html#jCpImage

NSF-supported Stampede opens the gates of advanced computation to thousands of research teams

SF-supported Stampede opens the gates of advanced computation to thousands of research teams March 28, 2013 Stampede is a world-class supercomputer with comprehensive simulation and data analysis capabilities. Credit: TACC A National Science Foundation-supported, world-class supercomputer called Stampede—which has already enabled research teams to predict where and when earthquakes may strike, how much sea levels could rise and how fast brain tumors grow—was officially dedicated today. Ads by Google Information processing – Software, hardware, robotics, A.I., algorithms, web, neuroscience. – http://www.technology.org The ceremony, held at the University of Texas at Austin’s Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) and attended by corporate, government, and university leaders, formally introduced Stampede to the open science community. Stampede is a cornerstone of NSF’s investment in an integrated advanced cyberinfrastructure, which empowers America’s scientists and engineers to interactively share advanced computational resources, data and expertise in order to further research across scientific disciplines. Stampede is now the most powerful and capable of the 16 high-performance computing, visualization and data analysis resources within the NSF Extreme Digital (XD) environment. “Cyberinfrastructure has increasingly become a critical component of the science and engineering enterprise and is essential to accelerating the pace of discovery and innovation in all fields of inquiry,” said Farnam Jahanian, head of NSF’s Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering. “Stampede is an important part of NSF’s portfolio for advanced computing infrastructure enabling cutting-edge foundational research for computational and data-intensive science and engineering. Society’s ability to address today’s global challenges depends on advancing cyberinfrastructure.” Joining Jahanian in dedicating Stampede were UT Austin President Bill Powers, Dell Enterprise Solutions President Marius Haas, Intel Vice President Diane Bryant, U.S. House Science Space and Technology Committee Chairman Lamar Smith, and TACC Director Jay Boisseau, who is also the leader of the Stampede project. Stampede expands the variety of data-intensive, computationally-challenging science and engineering applications that can be used with current national resources. It accommodates large-scale simulations that produce more accurate results. Stampede’s performance derives from two complementary processor technologies: First, a massive Dell cluster with Intel Xeon E5 processors provides a peak of 2.2 petaflops of computing power (this system has already been deployed and is fully subscribed for the next three months). 
Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-03-nsf-supported-stampede-gates-advanced-thousands.html#jCp

Write about your strongest memory of heart-pounding belly-twisting nervousness: what caused the adrenaline? Was it justified? How did you respond?

Grad School Scientific Computing Compilers – cs.colostate.edu/~mstrout/ The free, anonymously written and edited online encyclopedia was widely expected to fall prey to cranks and partisans. Instead, it has proven no less accurate than the venerable Encyclopedia Britannica, according to several analyses of the quality of its information. “The question is how?” asks DeDeo, who has studied the 11-year-old online knowledge repository as the product of a particularly cooperative human social system. “Wikipedia is an extremely high-functioning system. How do people create societies that have extremely high cooperation?” A great example of this cooperative nature is Wikipedia’s article on former U.S. President George W. Bush – a highly contested piece of Wiki real estate that has been edited some 45,000 times. “Show me a place on the Internet where people agree about George W. Bush?” asks DeDeo. “But the Wikipedia article reads as if it was written by aliens who didn’t care [about Bush] – although we know it was written by people who cared a lot.” Just how Wikipedia manages this collective balance is something DeDeo was able to study in detail because, unlike most other social systems, every Wikipedia edit is recorded. “It’s almost like you had closed circuit cameras running as a society is creating itself,” he says, “so every move could be studied and watched.” All these sequences of behaviors create what can be viewed as a historical grammar, like that of a language or even bird song. A bird song, for example, has very simple grammar, with few elements and combinations possible – what’s called a finite-state system. The historical language that creates and maintains Wikipedia might be expected to follow a rather limited grammar as well, but that’s not what DeDeo discovered. “The big result is that the Wikipedia behavior is what we call non-finite state,” DeDeo says. “It’s constantly generating new patterns of behavior that haven’t been seen before.” One possibility, he says, is that the unbounded source for these behavior patterns in Wikipedia is shared between people – it’s the product of everyone’s mind. “That’s what’s really exciting,” he says. More information: Read DeDeo’s paper on Arxiv (December 18, 2012). Journal reference: arXiv 

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-03-clues-wikipedia-super-mind.html#jCp

 

aveen Jain – Top Ten Lessons for an Entrepreneur

aveen Jain – Top Ten Lessons for an Entrepreneur

I’ve been an entrepreneur most of my adult life. Recently, on a long business flight, I began thinking about what it takes to become successful as an entrepreneur–and how I would even define the meaning “success” itself. The two ideas became more intertwined in my thinking: success as an entrepreneur, entrepreneurial success. I’ve given a lot of talks over the years on the subject of entrepreneurship. The first thing I find I have to do is to dispel the persistent myth that entrepreneurial success is all about innovative thinking and breakthrough ideas. I’ve found that entrepreneurial success usually comes through great execution, simply by doing a superior job of doing the blocking and tackling.

But what else does it take to succeed as an entrepreneur–and how should an entrepreneur define success?

Here’s what I came up with, a “Top Ten List” if you will:

10. Be passionate about what you are trying to achieve. You must be passionate about what you are trying to achieve. That means you’re willing to sacrifice a large part of your waking hours to the idea you’ve come up with. Passion will ignite the same intensity in the others who join you as you build a team to succeed in this endeavor.  And with passion, both your team and your customers are more likely to truly believe in what you are trying to do.

9. Focus. Great entrepreneurs focus intensely on an opportunity where others see nothing. This focus and intensity helps to eliminate wasted effort and distractions. Most companies die from indigestion rather than starvation i.e. companies suffer from doing too many things at the same time rather than doing too few things very well. Stay focused on the mission.

8. Success only comes from hard work. We all know that there is no such thing as overnight success. Behind every overnight success lies years of hard work and sweat. People with luck will tell you there’s no easy way to achieve success—and that luck comes to those who work hard. Successful entrepreneurs always give 100% of their efforts to everything they do. If you know you are giving your best effort, you’ll never have any reason for regrets. Focus on things you can control; stay focused on your efforts and let the results be what they will be.

7. Enjoy the journey—because the road to success is a long one.Everyone will teach you to focus on goals, but successful people focus on the journey and celebrate the milestones along the way. Is it worth spending a large part of your life trying to reach the destination if you didn’t enjoy the journey along the way? Won’t the team you attract to join you on your mission also enjoy the journey more as well? Wouldn’t it be better for all of you to have the time of your life during the journey, even if the destination is never reached?

6. Trust your gut instinct over spreadsheets. There are too many variables in the real world that you simply can’t put into a spreadsheet. Spreadsheets spit out results from your inexact assumptions and give you a false sense of security. In most cases, your heart and gut are still your best guide. The human brain works as a binary computer and can only analyze the exact information-based zeros and ones (or black and white). Our heart is more like a chemical computer that uses fuzzy logic to analyze information that can’t be easily defined in zeros and ones. We’ve all had experiences in business where our heart told us something was wrong while our brain was still trying to use logic to figure it all out. Sometimes a faint voice based on instinct resonates far more strongly than overpowering logic.

5. Be flexible but persistent. Every entrepreneur has to be agile in order to perform. You have to continually learn and adapt as new information becomes available. At the same time you have to remain persistent to the cause and mission of your enterprise. That’s where that faint voice becomes so important, especially when it is giving you early warning signals that things are going off-track. Successful entrepreneurs find the balance between listening to that voice and staying persistent in driving for success—because sometimes success is waiting right across from the transitional bump that’s disguised as failure.

4. Rely on your team. It’s a simple fact: no individual can be good at everything. Everyone needs people around them who have complimentary sets of skills. Entrepreneurs are an optimistic bunch of people and it’s very hard for them to believe that they are not good at certain things. It takes a lot of soul searching to find your own core skills and strengths. After that, find the smartest people you can who compliment your strengths. It’s easy to get attracted to people who are like you; the trick is to find people who are not like you but who are good at what they do—and what you can’t do.

3. Execution, execution, execution – unless you are the smartest person on earth (and who is) it’s likely that many others have thought about doing the same thing you’re trying to do. Success doesn’t necessarily come from breakthrough innovation but from flawless execution. A great strategy alone won’t win a game or a battle; the win comes from basic blocking and tackling.  All of us have seen entrepreneurs who waste too much time writing business plans and preparing power points. I believe that a business plan is too long if it’s more than one page. Besides, things never turn out exactly the way you envisioned them. No matter how much time you spend perfecting the plan, you still have to adapt according to the ground realities. You’re going to learn a lot more useful information from taking action rather than hypothesizing. Remember – stay flexible and adapt as new information becomes available.

2. Value honesty and integrity. I can’t imagine anyone ever achieving long term success without having honesty and integrity. These two qualities need to be at the core of everything we do. Everybody has a conscience—but too many people stop listening to it. There is always that faint voice that warns you when you are not being completely honest or even slightly off track from the path of integrity. Be sure to listen to that voice.

I’ve been an entrepreneur most of my adult life. Recently, on a long business flight, I began thinking about what it takes to become successful as an entrepreneur–and how I would even define the meaning “success” itself. The two ideas became more intertwined in my thinking: success as an entrepreneur, entrepreneurial success. I’ve given a lot of talks over the years on the subject of entrepreneurship. The first thing I find I have to do is to dispel the persistent myth that entrepreneurial success is all about innovative thinking and breakthrough ideas. I’ve found that entrepreneurial success usually comes through great execution, simply by doing a superior job of doing the blocking and tackling.

But what else does it take to succeed as an entrepreneur–and how should an entrepreneur define success?

Here’s what I came up with, a “Top Ten List” if you will:

10. Be passionate about what you are trying to achieve. You must be passionate about what you are trying to achieve. That means you’re willing to sacrifice a large part of your waking hours to the idea you’ve come up with. Passion will ignite the same intensity in the others who join you as you build a team to succeed in this endeavor.  And with passion, both your team and your customers are more likely to truly believe in what you are trying to do.

9. Focus. Great entrepreneurs focus intensely on an opportunity where others see nothing. This focus and intensity helps to eliminate wasted effort and distractions. Most companies die from indigestion rather than starvation i.e. companies suffer from doing too many things at the same time rather than doing too few things very well. Stay focused on the mission.

8. Success only comes from hard work. We all know that there is no such thing as overnight success. Behind every overnight success lies years of hard work and sweat. People with luck will tell you there’s no easy way to achieve success—and that luck comes to those who work hard. Successful entrepreneurs always give 100% of their efforts to everything they do. If you know you are giving your best effort, you’ll never have any reason for regrets. Focus on things you can control; stay focused on your efforts and let the results be what they will be.

7. Enjoy the journey—because the road to success is a long one.Everyone will teach you to focus on goals, but successful people focus on the journey and celebrate the milestones along the way. Is it worth spending a large part of your life trying to reach the destination if you didn’t enjoy the journey along the way? Won’t the team you attract to join you on your mission also enjoy the journey more as well? Wouldn’t it be better for all of you to have the time of your life during the journey, even if the destination is never reached?

6. Trust your gut instinct over spreadsheets. There are too many variables in the real world that you simply can’t put into a spreadsheet. Spreadsheets spit out results from your inexact assumptions and give you a false sense of security. In most cases, your heart and gut are still your best guide. The human brain works as a binary computer and can only analyze the exact information-based zeros and ones (or black and white). Our heart is more like a chemical computer that uses fuzzy logic to analyze information that can’t be easily defined in zeros and ones. We’ve all had experiences in business where our heart told us something was wrong while our brain was still trying to use logic to figure it all out. Sometimes a faint voice based on instinct resonates far more strongly than overpowering logic.

5. Be flexible but persistent. Every entrepreneur has to be agile in order to perform. You have to continually learn and adapt as new information becomes available. At the same time you have to remain persistent to the cause and mission of your enterprise. That’s where that faint voice becomes so important, especially when it is giving you early warning signals that things are going off-track. Successful entrepreneurs find the balance between listening to that voice and staying persistent in driving for success—because sometimes success is waiting right across from the transitional bump that’s disguised as failure.

4. Rely on your team. It’s a simple fact: no individual can be good at everything. Everyone needs people around them who have complimentary sets of skills. Entrepreneurs are an optimistic bunch of people and it’s very hard for them to believe that they are not good at certain things. It takes a lot of soul searching to find your own core skills and strengths. After that, find the smartest people you can who compliment your strengths. It’s easy to get attracted to people who are like you; the trick is to find people who are not like you but who are good at what they do—and what you can’t do.

3. Execution, execution, execution – unless you are the smartest person on earth (and who is) it’s likely that many others have thought about doing the same thing you’re trying to do. Success doesn’t necessarily come from breakthrough innovation but from flawless execution. A great strategy alone won’t win a game or a battle; the win comes from basic blocking and tackling.  All of us have seen entrepreneurs who waste too much time writing business plans and preparing power points. I believe that a business plan is too long if it’s more than one page. Besides, things never turn out exactly the way you envisioned them. No matter how much time you spend perfecting the plan, you still have to adapt according to the ground realities. You’re going to learn a lot more useful information from taking action rather than hypothesizing. Remember – stay flexible and adapt as new information becomes available.

2. Value honesty and integrity. I can’t imagine anyone ever achieving long term success without having honesty and integrity. These two qualities need to be at the core of everything we do. Everybody has a conscience—but too many people stop listening to it. There is always that faint voice that warns you when you are not being completely honest or even slightly off track from the path of integrity. Be sure to listen to that voice.

Give back. Success is a long journey and much more rewarding if you give back. By the time you get to success, lots of people will have helped you along the way. You’ll learn, as I have, that you rarely get a chance to help the people who helped you because in most cases, you don’t even know who they were. The only way to pay back the debts we owe is to help people we can help—and hope they will go on to help more people. When we are successful, we draw so much from the community and society that we live in we should think in terms of how we can help others in return. Sometimes it’s just a matter of being kind to people. Other times, offering a sympathetic ear or a kind word is all that’s needed. It’s our responsibility to do “good” with the resources we have available.

Measuring Success – Hopefully, you have internalized the secrets of becoming a successful entrepreneur. The next question you are likely to ask yourself is: How do we measure success? Success, of course, is very personal; there is no universal way of measuring success. What do successful people like Bill Gates and Mother Teresa have in common? On the surface it’s hard to find anything they share—and yet both are successful. I personally believe the real metric of success isn’t the size of your bank account. It’s the number of lives where you might be able to make a positive difference. This is the measure of success we need to apply while we are on our journey to success.